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Below is a list of information that should be included in an extensive background check.  

What separates an extensive background check from everything else is the ability to identify information from various disparate sources to gather a more accurate, comprehensive and complete picture.  By uncovering the complete picture, and not just a small piece, for example by only searching criminal records, you have a better chance of identifying critical red flags.

Here are the 20 Records That Should Be Included in an Extensive Background Check:

1 Personal Identifiers

Identifiers such as a date of birth and Social Security number are key to linking criminal records, bankruptcy records and other public records to the subject of the extensive background check.

2Address History

Knowing where the individual has lived is critical to determining which courts are necessary to search in order to identify historical civil and criminal history, and to find information from other public record sources.

3Professional History

A timeline of any employment affiliations, board memberships and nonprofit affiliations can show a history of affiliations with organizations riddled with scandals.

4International News Media

Most people are under the false impression that all news media publications are easily accessible on the Internet. Historical and international comprehensive news media can identify past issues that can’t be found on the Internet.

5Internet Searches

With the explosion of social media and the perceived “anonymity” of the Web, some people will put just about anything on the Internet.

6Corporate Affiliations

U.S.-based corporations where the individual is a corporate officer or registered agent can identify businesses or hidden affiliations.

7Criminal Record History (State and Federal)

Checking local and state criminal records is one of the most important facets of a extensive background check. Given that criminal history is the most critical area, it’s essential to conduct research at local courts or official government repositories.

8Civil Litigation (State and Federal)

As with criminal record history, it’s essential to conduct research at local courts, official government repositories or proprietary databases that cover the jurisdictions in which the individual has lived. Civil litigation can identify disputes with previous business partners, harassment allegations or a history of litigiousness.

9Bankruptcy Records

A history of bankruptcy or financial issues could reveal critical financial details.

10U.S. Tax Court Records

U.S. Tax Court records can reveal unpaid taxes or disputes over taxes, which can lead to information on income or assets.

11UCC Filings

Has the person been a creditor or debtor in any UCC filings? Did he or she pledge any assets as part of financing?

12Assets

Information relating to real property, motor vehicles, watercraft and aircraft records may show a pattern of living beyond one’s means.

13Judgment Filings

A history of judgment filings may identify a history of financial issues and/or litigiousness.

14Lien Filings

Similar to judgment filings, historical state or federal tax liens may show a history of financial trouble.

15Department of Motor Vehicle Records

A driving record request can identify traffic violations and, in most states, driving under the influence (DUI) records (which some states consider a criminal record).

16Professional Licensing

Records with local, state or federal regulatory bodies may reveal regulatory actions against professional licensees such as a certified public accountant, doctor, nurse, an attorney or even a private investigator.

17Professional Affiliations

In addition to having a professional license, professionals typically are affiliated with organizations that award certain credentials or designations, but you don’t know if they are really part of the organization unless you check.

18Financial Regulatory Searches

Especially for individuals who have previously served in the banking or financial industry, searches with financial regulatory bodies may identify previous violations or regulatory matters.

19Government Compliance Lists

A review of government compliance lists can identify sanctions from regulatory bodies or politically exposed persons around the world.

20Campaign Contributions

Political contributions may identify strong political ties or connections with polarizing political groups.

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4 replies
  1. jennifer snolis
    jennifer snolis says:

    what is the best and most uaccurate search site for backgrounds and locating people nationally and internationally for birth, marriage, death certificates, criminal, address, email, phone, employment backgrounds. i am a member of intellius right now but most of the things on there are public records and I am doing a private eye business locating missing people, as well people that adoptees are looking for biological parents and also parents who are “off the grid” that owe child support or are running from the law or bondsmen. thank you

    • Brian Willingham
      Brian Willingham says:

      There really is no one database that is the best and most accurate. They are all pretty good, but it’s important to always use multiple databases to find information. I don’t regularly use any of the commercially available databases such as Intellius, so I can’t really comment on them. I will say that from my experience, databases that can only be accessed by private investigators, for example, IRB, TLO, Merlin, TracersInfo, etc., are much more powerful with access to wider range of records.

      You are going to have a difficult time finding anyone “off the grid” in a database. It’s just the nature of the way these things work.

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. […] Civil Litigation (State and Federal) – As with criminal record history, it’s essential to conduct research at local courts, official government repositories or proprietary databases that cover the jurisdictions in which the individual has lived. Civil litigation can identify disputes with previous business partners, harassment allegations or a history of litigiousness.Source: diligentiagroup.com […]

  2. […] Civil Litigation (State and Federal) – As with criminal record history, it’s essential to conduct research at local courts, official government repositories or proprietary databases that cover the jurisdictions in which the individual has lived. Civil litigation can identify disputes with previous business partners, harassment allegations or a history of litigiousness.Source: diligentiagroup.com […]

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